Ask Questions Later

The Jerusalem Post reports: “Israeli experts analyse mRNA COVID vaccines long-term effects.” In the United States, the NIH is funding “studies to assess potential effects of COVID-19 vaccination on menstruation.”

Why were mRNA vaccines given to millions of people before these questions were answered? Do the answers matter to policy makers? A study at the University of California found that teenage boys are six times more likely to suffer heart complications from the vaccines, specifically cardiac myocarditis, than to be hospitalized for Covid-19. Despite this fact, both the USA and UK governments want to extend mRNA treatments to children.

See also: Existential Reproductive Risks.

Existential Reproductive Risks

We know that the current Covid-19 vaccines do not prevent transmission of the virus. This fact was announced today by CDC Director Dr Rochelle Walensky. But there is a more worrying question. What are the long-term side-effects of these vaccines? The underlying technology has never been used on humans. As everyone knows they rely on mRNA rather than a dead or weakened virus like traditional vaccines. Dr Robert Malone who invented the mRNA technology seems to believe that the worst case scenario in terms of side-effects is entirely possible. He writes in the Washington Times:

Known side effects include serious cardiac and thrombotic conditions…Unknown side effects which virologists fear may emerge include existential reproductive risks, additional autoimmune conditions, and various forms of disease enhancement, i.e., the vaccines can make people more vulnerable to reinfection by SARS-CoV-2 or reactivation of latent viral infections and associated diseases such as shingles.

We would need decades of data to rule out these side effects, including “existential reproductive risks.” For example, last month Pfizer halted distribution of its drug Chantix after finding the pill contained elevated levels of cancer-causing agents. Chantix had been on the market for fifteen years at that point.

The Dysgenics of War

Jack London writing in Cosmopolitan (November, 1900):

The stronger, the braver, the more indomitable, are selected to go to the wars, and to die early, without offspring. The weaker are sent to the plow and permitted to perpetuate their kind. As Doctor Jordan has remarked, the best are sent forth, the second‑best remain. But it does not stop at this. The best of the second‑best are next sent, and the third‑best is left. The French peasant of today demonstrates what manner of man is left to the soil after one hundred years or so of military selection. Where are the soldiers of Greece, Sparta, and Rome? They lie on countless fields of battle, and with them their descendants which were not.

Villages, Genetics, Genius

In The New York Review of Books this month Freeman Dyson reviews Scale: The Universal Laws of Growth, Innovation, Sustainability, and the Pace of Life in Organisms, Cities, Economies, and Companies by Geoffrey West. Dyson offers insight into why small cities and villages have historically produced men of genius and why the present-day trend toward mega-cities is almost certainly dysgenic.

If a small population is inbreeding, the rate of drift of the average measure of any human capability scales with the inverse square root of the population. Big fluctuations of the average happen in isolated villages far more often than in cities. On the average, people in villages are not more capable than people in cities. But if ten million people are divided into a thousand genetically isolated villages, there is a good chance that one lucky village will have a population with outstandingly high average capability, and there is a good chance that an inbreeding population with high average capability produces an occasional bunch of geniuses in a short time. The effect of genetic isolation is even stronger if the population of the village is divided by barriers of rank or caste or religion. Social snobbery can be as effective as geography in keeping people from spreading their genes widely.

A substantial fraction of the population of Europe and the Middle East in the time between 1000 BC and 1800 AD lived in genetically isolated villages, so that genetic drift may have been the most important factor making intellectual revolutions possible. Places where intellectual revolutions happened include, among many others, Jerusalem around 800 BC (the invention of monotheistic religion), Athens around 500 BC (the invention of drama and philosophy and the beginnings of science), Venice around 1300 AD (the invention of modern commerce), Florence around 1600 (the invention of modern science), and Manchester around 1750 (the invention of modern industry).

These places were all villages, with populations of a few tens of thousands, divided into tribes and social classes with even smaller populations. In each case, a small starburst of geniuses emerged from a small inbred population within a few centuries, and changed our ways of thinking irreversibly. These eruptions have many historical causes. Cultural and political accidents may provide unusual opportunities for young geniuses to exploit. But the appearance of a starburst must be to some extent a consequence of genetic drift. The examples that I mentioned all belong to Western cultures. No doubt similar starbursts of genius occurred in other cultures, but I am ignorant of the details of their history.

West’s neglect of villages as agents of change raises an important question. How likely is it that significant numbers of humans will choose to remain in genetically isolated communities in centuries to come?